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Arby's Pharrell Williams tie-in scores social media prize win and young consumers
In early 2014, the perception of the Arby's brand among younger demographics needed a boost. Concerned about losing relevance among its core audience and a lack of recognition with younger guests, Arby's sought to re-introduce and re-position itself by inserting the brand into current pop-culture conversations and events through social media. The 2014 Grammy's provided Arby's with the perfect storm – an opportunistic occasion to leverage the power of Twitter and insert the brand into the conversation among a younger audience. The Wall Street Journal recognized Arby's tweet to Pharrell as the second best pop culture moment of 2014 and also declared it as one of the top fashion moments of 2014 as well. No one could have imagined how a single tweet could leverage the power of social and traditional media to catapult a brand into relevancy and positively impact sales.
Source: Shorty Industry Awards

Cheetos ‘Bag of Bones’ finalist for social media award
Every Halloween, Americans spend about $2 billion on candy. And Cheetos wanted in on that action. We faced a daunting challenge: get people to eat and talk about Cheetos, a savory snack, on candy's biggest day of the year. And we needed to do so without a big budget. We knew that making Halloween-focused ads wouldn't be enough to break through. Instead we looked at what gets people talking about Cheetos snacks. Research revealed a curious finding: people's desire for Cheetos increased when they saw other people playing with the product. What's more, the brand was seeing thousands of social mentions a day about the product's playfulness. To get the brand noticed on Halloween, our strategy was to lean into the playfulness of our product and give it scale specifically for the holiday. We gave America a limited-edition Cheetos snack to play with, which we called Bag of Bones. Then we used social channels to get people talking and playing. We held a Twitter contest that asked fans to submit their most creative skeletons. And the meme spilled over onto Facebook and Instagram, with 1,000+ skeletons uploaded across the platforms. We complemented the user-generated content with a social campaign that proved the most engaging in brand history. The social films saw Facebook-interaction rates that were nine times higher than the Cheetos average. These interactions led to 2 million people seeing the films on the basis of their friends' recommendations—this exposure was additional to the views spurred by media dollars.
Source: Shorty Industry Awards

Papa John’s custom NFL team pizzas
In order to create shareable, engaging content as well as highlight the better ingredients used in Papa John's pizza, we gave NFL fans, their very own piece of content that connects to both their favorite team and our commitment to 'better pizza.' We hired a pizza artist to create real life NFL team logos on pizza. To capture the before and after, we filmed the full pizza build process right in our Papa John's kitchen and edited the whole pizza build in hyperlapse video format. We featured the exclusive team centric content on Instagram as an official channel launch mechanism. To encourage sharing of the content, we released the first set of videos during the NFL Draft, fueling the brand's second screen habits during the nationally televised event.
Source: Shorty Industry Awards

Domino’s adds voice ordering to Domino’s mobile app
Domino's, in partnership with CP+B and Nuance, created and launched a voice controlled pizza ordering assistant named Dom on their iPhone and Android mobile app. Dom has a one track mind focused on pizza and is happy to take your order, or just tell a cheesy joke. Dom adds to Domino's reputation of leveraging technology to create fun new utilities that benefit consumers, with things like Pizza Builder, Pizza Hero, Domino's Live, and Pizza Tracker.
Source: Shorty Industry Awards

Burger King ‘Chicken Fries’ are back
Burger King had pioneered fast food customization with its "Have it Your Way" slogan, but in early 2014, it found itself in a competitive market. Attracting the millennial attention—and finding creative ways to accommodate their new behaviors, tastes and routines—wasn't easy. To get more teens and young millennials in the door, we needed to get them excited about the brand again, and give them a reason to go. By January 2014, we noticed a unique trend happening in social: Millennials cried out for a Burger King product that was discontinued nearly two years prior: Chicken Fries. Our solution was to bring them back with a massive digital-first launch, and give our fans all the credit for their return.
Source: Shorty Industry Awards



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